In Transit: Travel Essentials In My CabinZero Bag

CABINZERO CLASSIC 44L CABIN BAG

Truth be told, I wanted to test this bag a number of times before featuring it in a blog post. The wonderful people from CabinZero sent this bag to me a couple of months ago and after taking it with me to some of my travels, I can finally attest to its great quality. Among their selection of bags, I chose their Classic 44L ultra light cabin bag in the color ‘Cabin White’.

How likely am I to recommend this bag? One hundred percent. All these years of constant travels and I’ve finally found a bag that’s both functional and stylish. I find it very spacious, comfortable to wear on the shoulders, and lightweight. May it be a trip to the seas, the cities, or the mountains, I can easily take this bag with me to any kind of trip. CabinZero bags have airline-approved carry on sizes, a 10 year warranty (25 years if you like them on Facebook), and a global lost and found tracker (in the event your bag gets stolen or misplaced). With all these impressive features, I’m genuinely looking forward to buying more CabinZero bags soon, this time in different colors and sizes.

CabinZero Travel Essentials / www.dannapena.com

MY TRAVEL ESSENTIALS

Items I brought with me when I travelled to Sapporo last November. Since we visited on the cusp of autumn and winter, I made sure to bring items to keep me warm, not to mention items to keep me busy during idle moments in transit.

1. ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE

This book had been collecting dust in my house until some unknown force propelled me to pick it up and peruse its pages for the first time. I bought this book from National Bookstore when I was in grade school, though I highly doubt I understood the premise of it then. Classic impulsive book buyer Danna. The book revolves around the Buendia family line in the town of Macondo, where a lot of magical realism, incest, and more incest (just a warning) ensue. Book reviews show a 50/50 scale of love and hate, but one can’t deny that there’s a lot of beautifully written prose here by Nobel Prize winner Gabriel Garcia Márquez.

2. A CUP OF SAKE BENEATH THE CHERRY TREES

I usually carry one book with me, but for longer travel periods I tend to bring more than just one reading material. I absolutely love the ideas, thoughts and stories here by Yoshida Kenko, a Japanese author and medieval Buddhist monk. Although some of his sentiments are dated (particularly towards women), I immensely enjoyed his passages about stillness and living life modestly. It’s incredible how writings from the 14th century can still be so relatable, especially to 21st century readers who live in a fast-paced, technology-driven world.

3. BELLE DU JOUR JOURNAL

While I was working with my previous company, I collaborated with our design team to make this journal in partnership with Belle du Jour. I first started using it as a prayer journal and ended up becoming a full-fledged diary where I write down the happenings of my daily life.

4. IPHONE 6

I often get questions on what camera I use. While I’ve started shooting with my Fujifilm XA-2 in 2017, I’m still an iPhone camera user through and through. It’s way more convenient to whip this phone out when there’s a moment to capture. So photography-wise, I alternate between the two gadgets.

5. ROMOSS POWER BANK

My absolute favorite power bank. This fella never fails to last me longer than expected. It’s almost as if its life is akin to that of a car battery’s.

6. SUNNIES SPECS

My grade on both eyes are 500+, so I need my prescription glasses with me especially during long airplane rides.

7. UNIQLO SCARF AND DENIM JACKET

Clothing to stay warm and toasty! As much as I want to advocate slow fashion—the True Cost documentary changed my life—ethically made outerwear choices are very limited here in the Philippines.

(Side note: To get into slow fashion, a good start would be to research how ethical the brands of your clothes are and to limit future purchases from ones that score low. An enlightening article that struck me too was about the prejudices towards Chinese factories, and how not all ‘Made in China’ items are made from poor working conditions. Unfortunately, we can never tell for sure if a piece from a fast fashion brand is made ethically or unethically. However, I still think it’s important to be aware of the brands we purchase from and to choose the lesser evils if not given any other choice.)

In partnership with CabinZero

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